Festival-goers learn true significance of Cinco de Mayo

Written by on May 7, 2014 in Featured - No comments
Nearly 3,000 attended this year’s Cinco de Mayo celebration in Upper Fell’s Point. - Photo by Tom Scilipoti

Nearly 3,000 attended this year’s Cinco de Mayo celebration in Upper Fell’s Point. – Photo by Tom Scilipoti

Festival-goers enjoy live music. - Photo by Erik Zygmont

Festival-goers enjoy live music. – Photo by Erik Zygmont

Some wore traditional clothing. - Photo by Tom Scilipoti

Some wore traditional clothing. – Photo by Tom Scilipoti

We don’t always run into the the Most Interesting Man in the World, but when we do... Oh, nevermind. - Photo by Erik Zygmont

We don’t always run into the the Most Interesting Man in the World, but when we do… Oh, nevermind. – Photo by Erik Zygmont

Cinco de Mayo: While some Americans mistakenly assume that the holiday is Mexico’s Independence Day, it actually celebrates the May 5, 1862, victory of the Mexican Army over the French, near the Mexican city of Puebla.

Today, the holiday is a celebration of Mexican culture and a good time to relax with good food, good friends and–for those of age–good drink.

Last weekend, Education Based Latino Outreach–a Fell’s Point organization that offers English classes, computer classes, after-school programs and more to Latinos and other non-English speakers alike–held an annual Cinco de Mayo celebration lon S. Broadway, between Fleet St. and Eastern Ave.

Miguel Vicente, executive director of EBLO, said that the festival is meant to bring the communities of Fell’s Point and Upper Fell’s Point–which has a large Latino population–together.

“We saw a very diverse crowd, and that’s what we were trying to accomplish,” Vicente said, adding that between 2,500 and 3,000 tickets were sold.

Vicente gave credit to Nicolas Ramos, owner of Upper Fell’s Point’s Arcos Restaurante, for launching the public Cinco de Mayo celebration about a year ago.

by Erik Zygmont
editor@baltimoreguide.com

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