Meet Your Merchants: Canton/Highlandtown

Written by on March 27, 2013 in Business, Featured - 1 Comment

From Boston to Bank…Conkling to Curley…Eastern to East… Dean to Decker…Fagley to Fleet…and everywhere in between… these local merchants have what you need.

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From Boston to Bank…Conkling to Curley…Eastern to East… Dean to Decker…Fagley to Fleet…and everywhere in between…  these local merchants have what you need.

 

FutureCare Canton Harbor

“For one minute, please stand here in silence, look at the sky, and contemplate how awesome life is.”

Such reads a sign posted at the entrance to FutureCare Canton Harbor.

“Not a bad idea” seems the appropriate reaction, given the water view and green grounds.

Patients, residents, and visitors alike most likely stop for a moment, turn around, and take in the harbor before heading inside and going about their business, maybe with a new perspective.

For the rest of the story look on page 14 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Epic Church

“Church for the rest of us.”

The slogan nicely sums up Epic Church.

“The beauty of it is that it’s exclusive by being inclusive,” jokes Pastor Chris Lockemy, 31.

With his many tattoos and punk-rock style, he looks made to captivate an audience from the stage—or a congregation from the pulpit.

For the rest of the story look on page 15 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

GNC Canton

Open almost exactly 12 years ago, GNC is one of the very few businesses that has been at the Can Company since it started offering retail space in 2001.

“Once that sign up, we had customers right away,” said David Picarello, who owns the store with his wife.

The idea for the business came to Picarello during his Teamster days. Because he was young and “not like a real trucker guy,” he found a nice niche in the transport industry—driving actors to and from the movie and television shoots that seemed to be all over Baltimore in the 1990s.

For the rest of the story look on page 16 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Hudson Street Stackhouse

It’s a neighborhood bar with a huge draft list, and sometimes a hockey game breaks out.

The Hudson Street Stackhouse—hidden among rowhomes near Hudson Street’s intersection with Lakewood Ave.—is a testament to owner Dominic DeSantis’s ability to take his own interests and create something for the whole neighborhood.

For the rest of the story look on page 21 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Looney’s Pub

Established in 1993, Looney’s Pub was the first bar and restaurant in what is now Canton’s beer-thirty mecca—O’Donnell Square.

“We were in the right place at the right time,” said general manager John Mundth. “We were really the first bar in Canton.”

“It’s a sports-themed Irish pub,” he added, pointing out the winning combination that has brought Looney’s vast popularity.

Most people like sports, and most people enjoy Irish pubs, so when the two are executed flawlessly, you have a recipe for success.

For the rest of the story look on page 22 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Tidewater Property Maintenance

Founded in February 2010 by Stanley Greenberg, Marc Greenberg and Delbert Lair, Tidewater Property Maintenance LLC is already making a name for itself as a one-call operation handling general property maintenance, remodels, renovations, and “any other projects, large or small.”

“We do it all,” says Lair, Tidewater’s Director of Operations. “Rather than having to call someone to make minor repairs to your plumbing, a different company to make your drywall repairs, and yet another company to power-wash your exterior siding, we take care of all those for you after first providing a free estimate.”

For the rest of the story look on page 23 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Loading Dock Liquors

Although it is small, Loading Dock Liquors, a tidy store at the corner of Boston and Fleet streets, always seems to have what the customer is looking for.

“We have all kinds of people come in here,” said Rodney Scardina, who manages the store for owner William Bonnett.

“During the holidays, it’s funny—you’ll have a guy picking up a fifth of Richards in one aisle, and a guy getting a bottle of Dom in another.”

For the rest of the story look on page 24 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Sip & Bite Restaurant

For a place described so simply—“champagne taste on a beer budget”—Sip & Bite Restaurant sure gets a lot of attention: the Food Network, Fox 45, Maryland Public Television, 98 Rock, WJZ, and countless newspapers, magazines and books have featured the Canton landmark.

Even the sign out front was named the Best Sign of 2012 by Signs of the Times magazine.

Celebrities like Michael Phelps come in and eat at the counter; Michelle Obama is rumored to have sent an aide inside to pick up some crab cakes.

But celebrities aside, Sip & Bite remains an extraordinary place to ordinary people.

For the rest of the story look on page 25 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

G&A Restaurant

“Come on back here—I want to show you something,” says Andrew Farantos, owner of G & A Restaurant, a Highlandtown landmark.

The layout of the restaurant is a long rectangle. Customers enter to find a cash register and counter on the left and a grill on the right, where the famous Coney Island hot dogs are made. Walk in a little farther, and there is a lunch counter on the right and booths on the left. Finally, booths line the sides of the rear dining room, which resembles a long hall leading to the kitchen.

For the rest of the story look on page 26 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

 The Laughing Pint

If your present job is not working out for you, you can always decide that you want to open a bar, sit down, write a business plan, get a loan, and open it.

It’s so simple and by-the-book that for some reason it sounds like a long shot—doesn’t your family have to own the same bar for a million years for you to do that in Baltimore?—but Shannon Cassidy did it.

Her Laughing Pint has become a Highlandtown favorite and a destination for art, food, beer, and cocktail enthusiasts across Baltimore.

“We’re a neighborhood bar,” Cassidy says, refusing to overstate the cozy pub, which features shuffleboard, billiards, ping pong and board games.

For the rest of the story look on page 26 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

Scooter’s Seafood Carryout
Ruth Lurz looks over at her father, Dimitrios “Jimmy” Kaitis, founder and owner of Scooter’s Seafood Carryout in Fell’s Point.

A rugged, stout man with a thick mustache, Kaitis is 74 years old.

“He’s a good guy, isn’t he?” she says. “I think that’s how we’ve been able to survive.”

Survive and thrive would be a better choice of words. On a recent Thursday afternoon, Scooter’s had people lined up and waiting for fresh, steamed crabs.

For the rest of the story look on page 27 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.


Roman’s Place

There’s a bar hidden on residential S. Decker St., just north of Patterson Park.

“People call us all the time and say they can’t find us,” said Andrea Butler, staff member and daughter of owner Roman Kuzmiw.

Established in 1986, there are no gimmicks at Roman’s, just rock-solid, honest home-cooked food.

“It’s like going to your parents’ house to eat,” said Butler.

For the rest of the story look on page 28 of The Baltimore Guide or this week’s electronic edition.

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