Reviving a Baltimore folk art

Written by on November 12, 2014 in Featured, Photo Galleries - No comments
Felicia Zannino-Baker, owner of the Highlandtown Gallery, adds a little detail. - Photo by Erik Zygmont

Felicia Zannino-Baker, owner of the Highlandtown Gallery, adds a little detail. – Photo by Erik Zygmont

Artist Cindy Vargas crafts beaded and chain maille jewelry and Christmas ornaments at the Highlandtown Gallery, which is featuring her work. - Photo by Erik Zygmont

Artist Cindy Vargas crafts beaded and chain maille jewelry and Christmas ornaments at the Highlandtown Gallery, which is featuring her work. – Photo by Erik Zygmont

Debbie Lynn Zwiebach takes a break from her giclée and fine art wooden puzzles, featured at Higlhandtown Gallery, to help paint the screen. - Photo by Erik Zygmont

Debbie Lynn Zwiebach takes a break from her giclée and fine art wooden puzzles, featured at Higlhandtown Gallery, to help paint the screen. – Photo by Erik Zygmont

Last Saturday, the Highlandtown Gallery, 248 S. Conkling St., hosted a community screen-painting event. in which residents were invited to paint screens that would later adorn the upper windows of the gallery building.

Painted screens are an important part of Baltimore’s folk history, and they have received more attention as of late, thanks to folklorist Elaine Eff’s acclaimed book, “The Painted Screens of Baltimore: An Urban Folk Art Revealed.”

Painted screens can be found throughout Baltimore, though they are particularly prevalent in the Southeast. There is a push underway in Highlandtown to reviving the art, and plans for a painted-screens walking tour are underway.

For more information on painted screens, visit paintedscreens.org.

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